Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Monday the city was easing coronavirus restrictions on bars and restaurants, as well as on barbershops, beauty salons and gyms. The changes are Lightfoot’s latest attempt to ease the financial burden on Chicago businesses by lifting frequently criticized restrictions.



a group of people sitting at a table with a bunch of stuffed animals: Mourners add to a memorial on Sept. 9, 2020, during a vigil in memory of Dajore Wilson, 8, near where she was killed at 47th Street and South Union Avenue in the Canaryville neighborhood.


© Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Mourners add to a memorial on Sept. 9, 2020, during a vigil in memory of Dajore Wilson, 8, near where she was killed at 47th Street and South Union Avenue in the Canaryville neighborhood.



a traffic light at night: The setting sun is is seen along East Madison Street before the fall equinox on Sept. 21, 2020, in Chicago.


© Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
The setting sun is is seen along East Madison Street before the fall equinox on Sept. 21, 2020, in Chicago.

The mayor’s comments came as Illinois public health officials Monday reported 1,709 newly diagnosed cases and 13 additional confirmed deaths of people with COVID-19, raising the statewide tally to 289,639 known cases and 8,614 deaths.



a person preparing food in a kitchen: Kelly Helgesen of Takeaway Bagel makes sourdough bagels at Superkhana International on Sept. 19, 2020, in Chicago.


© Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Kelly Helgesen of Takeaway Bagel makes sourdough bagels at Superkhana International on Sept. 19, 2020, in Chicago.

Meanwhile, the worldwide death toll from the coronavirus eclipsed 1 million.

COVID-19 in Illinois by the numbers: Here’s a daily update on key metrics in your area

COVID-19 cases in Illinois by ZIP code: Search for your neighborhood

Illinois’ new COVID-19 plan: How the state will manage any outbreaks, in 3 charts

Illinois coronavirus graphs: The latest data on deaths, confirmed cases, tests and more

Here’s what’s happening Tuesday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

7:02 a.m.: Lightfoot to appear in web discussion on economic recovery



Isabel Aguilar and her son, Diego, 5, create a poster at a rally to protest the possible future redevelopment of the Discount Mall in the Little Village neighborhood on Sept. 16, 2020, in Chicago.


© John J. Kim / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Isabel Aguilar and her son, Diego, 5, create a poster at a rally to protest the possible future redevelopment of the Discount Mall in the Little Village neighborhood on Sept. 16, 2020, in Chicago.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot was set to appear in an online event Tuesday afternoon on “Economic recovery in American cities” sponsored by the Brookings Institution.

Lightfoot was set to discuss with Chicago Community Trust CEO and Brookings Trustee Helene Gayle “how the city is leveraging the public, private, and philanthropic sectors to rebuild better and set a course to be more racially inclusive,” according to Brookings.



a person standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Stacey Michelon, left, and Elizabeth Posner raise their fists while repeating a chant during a gathering to remember late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at Federal Plaza on Sept. 19, 2020, in Chicago.


© John J. Kim / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Stacey Michelon, left, and Elizabeth Posner raise their fists while repeating a chant during a gathering to remember late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at Federal Plaza on Sept. 19, 2020, in Chicago.

More details are available on the Brookings site. —Chicago Tribune staff



Jo Padilla speaks with a proxy outside a residential building while attempting to enumerate residents for the U.S. census in the Ravenswood neighborhood on Sept. 24, 2020, in Chicago.


© Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Jo Padilla speaks with a proxy outside a residential building while attempting to enumerate residents for the U.S. census in the Ravenswood neighborhood on Sept. 24, 2020, in Chicago.

6:56 a.m.: Former Chicago schools chief protests with Arlington Heights families, calling for in-school instruction: ‘Our young people are hostages’

Joining organizers of a rally in Arlington Heights Saturday calling for schools to open for student onsite learning, the former Chicago Public Schools chief told the crowd kids are being held “hostage.”

“There is no reason why we could not have opened our schools. This is simply the hostage taking of our young people,” said Paul Vallas, former CEO of Chicago Public Schools, the nation’s third largest school district. “Our young people are hostages.”

Organizers estimated close to 300 people attended the “Rally to Reopen Our Schools” at North School Park in Arlington Heights Saturday.

A group of Township High School District 214 parents and students planned the afternoon rally to call for school buildings reopening for in-class instruction. Families from other local school districts also participated, including Arlington Heights School District 25 – which is a feeder elementary school district for SD214 – and Glenbrook High School District 225, based in Glenview.



a room filled with furniture and a large window: While the inside sits empty, Bob Hook and Holly King drink and dine outside the Jarvis Square Tavern in the Rogers Park neighborhood on Sept. 28, 2020, in Chicago.


© Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
While the inside sits empty, Bob Hook and Holly King drink and dine outside the Jarvis Square Tavern in the Rogers Park neighborhood on Sept. 28, 2020, in Chicago.

Read more here. — Karie Angel Luc

6 a.m.: New city report on battling crime problem highlights domestic violence in Chicago, and says it may be significantly underreported during pandemic

Domestic violence remains a stubborn piece of the puzzle in the effort to deal with Chicago’s overall violence issues, and may be underreported during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new report issued by Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s administration.

The 103-page report dubbed “Our City, Our Safety: A Comprehensive Plan to Reduce Violence in Chicago” acknowledged how Chicago’s intractable gun violence, which has given the city an unflattering national reputation, has overshadowed domestic, or family-related, violence, such as domestic batteries, crimes that are statistically more common.

“Although it does not garner the same level of media attention, the incidence of domestic violence is actually greater than that of community or gun violence,” according to Lightfoot’s report, which was to be released publicly Tuesday morning.



a group of people standing in front of a sign: More than 4,000 hospital workers at University of Illinois Hospital went on strike on Sept. 14, 2020, after failing to agree on a contract with the hospital.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
More than 4,000 hospital workers at University of Illinois Hospital went on strike on Sept. 14, 2020, after failing to agree on a contract with the hospital.

As the mayor has done in the past, the new report calls the city’s violence problem a public health crisis and one that reflects entrenched racial inequity. The report calls for prevention efforts and community empowerment despite funding challenges, after the city endured a summer spike in homicides.



a group of people sitting at a table in a restaurant: Andrew Marinelli cleans the bar as the staff prepares for dinner service in the rooftop canopy area of Roots Handmade Pizza South Loop on Sept. 28, 2020.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Andrew Marinelli cleans the bar as the staff prepares for dinner service in the rooftop canopy area of Roots Handmade Pizza South Loop on Sept. 28, 2020.

But the report paid special attention to domestic violence, and the effect the pandemic could be having on it. Crime experts and law enforcement leaders across the country had warned about possible upticks in domestic crimes and family-related incidents as the coronavirus lingered and government restrictions kept more people in their homes and with fewer options to avoid abusive relationships.

Read more here. —Jeremy Gorner

In case you missed it

Here are five stories from Monday related to COVID-19:

“We’re not there yet,” on in-person CPS learning, Mayor Lori Lightfoot said.

United Airlines pilots accepted a deal to avoid nearly 3,000 furloughs.

Here’s one family’s COVID-19 journey, and how life changed in a weekend.

For Chicago’s theaters, an opportunity for more racial diversity also comes at a time of crisis.

Chef partnerships are becoming more common during the COVID-19 pandemic as pros adapt to survive.

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©2020 the Chicago Tribune

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